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Inline Hockey Skates - HockeyGiant, Your Hockey Equipment Source

Inline hockey skates are of course very similar to ice hockey skates. Upon quick inspection, you can see the most obvious difference is that ice hockey skates have plastic holders and steel runners while inline hockey skates have a metal chassis with rubber/polyurethane wheels. The actual boots that you put on your feet into are almost indistinguishable when you have an inline boot and an ice hockey boot side by side. Nevertheless, traditionally, ice hockey boots were and are, in most cases still, a bit stiffer than inline hockey boots. The difference is barely noticeable these days, though, so if you're an ice hockey player looking for inline skates, or vice versa, you shouldn't have any trouble making the transition in terms of comfort and fit.

When you're purchasing inline hockey skates, you should consider a few key factors. First, you should consider the quality of the boot materials. If you're playing highly competitive hockey, you should make sure to choose a pair of high quality skates with a stiff, supportive boot. If you're just playing recreationally then you don't have to worry as much about having maximum ankle support and protection. Next, you'll want to consider the quality of the wheels and bearings that come with your skates. High quality hockey bearings and wheels are lighter, more durable and "faster" than lower quality wheels and bearings.

One more thing to consider as you browse through our selection of inline hockey skates is the durometer rating of the wheels that are included with the skates. Inline hockey wheels are made in a variety durometer ratings which indicate the hardness of the wheels. Softer wheels (lower durometer rating) are appropriate for smoother surfaces. Harder wheels (higher durometer rating) are appropriate for grittier surfaces such as asphalt. Also, heavier players require wheels that are just a bit harder than lighter players require because if the wheels are too soft to support the skater, they'll flex and bend under the weight, and eventually break down or completely blow out.